Events/Calendar

 

Wed, Nov 14
Double Feature!

 

How Much of Other's Work May I Use in My Own Writing?

Rob Kasunic
Rob Kasunic

That question, important to writers in all genres, will be explored November 14 from 1:15-2:15 at AWWNM, by Rob Kasunic, Deputy General Counsel at the United States Copyright Office, Library of Congress.

Kasunic will explain the "Fair Use Doctrine", which allows limited use of the work of others for specified purposes that would not be copyright infringement. Kasunic holds a B.A. in political science from Columbia University, and a J.D. degree from University of Baltimore. He has served as co-chair of the Washington, D.C. Chapter of the Copyright Society of the USA.

See www.kasunic.com All AWWNM events are free and open to the public at the National Press Club, 529 14th St NW, 13th Floor, McLendon Room, Washington, D.C. 20045.

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Wed, Nov 14
Double Feature!

 

OKLAHOMA WOMEN WRITERS: PULSE OF BLOOD MEMORY

Rilla Askew
Rilla Askew

Oklahoma-born Rilla Askew, one of America's multi-honored contemporary women writers, will speak on how her themes of "blood memory", interweave with the work of other premier Oklahoma women writers, historical and contemporary.

Askew will also introduce her latest fiction "Kind of Kin" based on Oklahoma's immigration law.

Askew's presentation is cosponsored by AWWNM, Oklahoma Center for the Book, and Friends of Oklahoma Center for the Book as part of AWWNM's 50-state project to honor America's top-tier women writers in 4-state groups monthly. All AWWNM programs are free and open to the public at the National Press Club, 529 14th St NW, 13th Floor, McLendon Room, Washington, D.C. 20045.

Oklahoman Rilla Askew, one of America's multi-honored women writers, will speak November 14 on how her themes of "blood memory" interweave with the work of other premier Oklahoma women writers, historical and contemporary.
        Her presentation will be 12:00-1:15 p.m. at the National Press Club, 529 14th St NW, 13th Floor, McLendon Room, Washington, D.C. 20045.
        Oklahoma Center for the Book, Friends of the Oklahoma Center for the Book, and AWWNM are cosponsoring the event as part of AWWNM's 50-state Project which monthly honors top-tier women writers in groups of four states, rotated alphabetically through the calendar year.
        Askew also will introduce "Kind of Kin", her latest fiction, featuring "an ambitious state legislator, a fractured family, and a Bible-believing small-town community dealing with fallout from a state immigration law."
         "America is my subject. Oklahoma is the landscape where my stories unfold", Askew explained.
         "Pulse of blood memory" is Askew's phrase describing unity of familial generations, as well as Oklahoma as microcosm of America's collective pulse as a nation with its own historical "blood memory" narrative.
         Askew, once an aspirant to an acting career, is winner of an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
         "I am extremely thrilled and honored to be thought of as a writer to represent women writers in Oklahoma", Askew said. "Fire in Beulah", about 1920 race relations in Oklahoma, is one of her most- heralded works.
         "Oklahoma Center for the Book is excited about the opportunity to showcase some of our state's notable women writers", said Connie G. Armstrong, executive director of the OCFB.
         "Oklahoma Department of Libraries will produce special materials for AWWNM on Oklahoma women writers, and for Askew's November 14 presentation. So we'll be able to give a good acknowledgment to Oklahoma's women writers", Armstrong added. Bill Young,Public Information Manager for the Oklahoma Department of Libraries, will chair preparation of these permanent educational resources featuring women writers.
         "AWWNM is graced to host an American woman writer of the high calibre of Rilla Askew. From the dust bowl of the 1930s to now, Oklahoma women have been praised as "the glue that held families together. They wrote thoughtfully about pioneer experiences then, and Askew continues that tradition," said Janice Law, AWWNM founder.
         Askew's stellar literary recognition includes: 2003 induction into Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame, three Oklahoma Book Awards, two Western Heritage Awards, the Texas Book Award (formerly called the Violet Crown Award), and nominations for PEN/Faulkner and Dublin IMPAC Prize.

See State-Meant 4 U page

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Tues, October 23

 

Adams to Wharton: The Ransom Center's American Women Writers

Brenda Cough
Dr. Thomas F. Staley

One of America's foremost literary scholars and collectors, Dr. Thomas F. Staley, renowned director of the prestigious Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin, will speak Tuesday, October 23 at the National Press Club, McLendon Room. 529 14th St NW, 13th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20045 on "Adams to Wharton: The Ransom Center's American Women Writers". Staley, a revered icon of literati world-wide, known as an entertaining speaker, will discuss The Ransom Center's archives of American women writers Carson McCullers, Edith Wharton, Alice Adams, Elizabeth Hardwick, and other women. Free.

       Charismatic is routinely used describing Dr. Thomas F. Staley, director of the world-renowned Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin, who will speak Tuesday, October 23 at the National Press Club, McLendon Room. 529 14th St NW, 13th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20045.
Witty, magnetic, charming, the scholarly collector has the gift of making whomever he is speaking with feel as if they are the most important person in the room.
        "It is a particular, encouraging coup to have an American literary icon of Dr. Thomas F. Staley's stature, speak at a startup museum like AWWNM", said Janice Law, AWWNM founder.
        AWWNM's Grand Opening was February 13, 2012.
        The event is free and open to the public. Staley's lecture is titled: "Adams to Wharton: The Ransom Center's American Women Writers".
        AWWNM's mission is to honor America's premier women writers, historic and contemporary.
        Staley, known as a vivacious, entertaining presenter, will speak from noon-1 p.m. October 23, exploring the nature and storied acquisition of Ransom archives of American women literary lionesses Carson McCullers, Edith Wharton, Elizabeth Hardwick, Adrienne Kennedy, Jayne Anne Phillips, Diane Johnson and other premier American women writers.
        The visionary Staley has directed the Ransom Center since 1988, propelling it to international prominence. He is a Fulbright scholar and the author of 15 books.
        Ransom, named for founder and University of Texas president and chancellor Harry Ransom, houses the Woodward and Bernstein Watergate papers, the Robert DeNiro and Norman Mailer archives, and much more of America's literary heritage, included in 36 million leaves of manuscripts, one million rare books, five million photos, and 100,000 works of art.
        Ransom's mission is to advance the study of arts and humanities, "to acquire original cultural materials for the purposes os scholarship, education and delight", and to preserve and make the material available to the public.
        "Nobody duplicates Tom's multi-faceted capacities", says a London book dealer. "You could get a scholar to do that job. You could get the head of a rare books library. You could get a terrific fund-raiser. You could get somebody who had even two of those three attributes. But you can't get anyone like Tom Staley. Tom is out on his own. He's sui generis," said the colleague.

See Program Videos page

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Sat, Sept 22
Kathy Jentz

American Women Writers, Empire State CFB & NY State Society Cosponsored Event!
Saturday, September 22, from 6-8 p.m. the American Women Writers National Museum (AWWNM) will cosponsor a literary reception with Empire State (New York) Center for the Book and the New York State Society of Washington, D.C. (NYSS).

Literary New York Comes to D.C. will be held at the Army Navy Club, Eagle Grill, 901 17th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006. The event is part of AWWNM's 50-state Project honoring top-tier women writers from four states each month, grouped in alphabetical order. New York, North Carolina, North Dakota and Ohio women writers are honored in September.

Beverly Frey, vice president of NYSS; Janice Law, founder of AWWNM, and Rocco Staino, chair of Empire State CFB who are chairing the event will speak briefly about their organizations.

New York writers will sign and sell books. Casual attire, light hors d' oeuvres, and cash bar.

For further info, contact one of the three sponsoring organizations on line.

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Thurs, August 16
Jennifer Cognard-Black Melissa Goldthwaite
Jennifer Cognard-Black
Melissa Goldthwaite
April Linder Levy
April Linder
E.J. Levy

 

Edible Poems? & Other Literary Foodstuffs

Fulbright Scholar Jennifer Cognard-Black of St.Mary's College, will moderate an August 16 AWWNM panel of writers who blend food history sandwiched within literary eras and genres, using "the recipe as a foundational text in American culture".

Panelists include: Melissa Goldthwaite and April Linder, professors at St. Joseph's University, and E.J. Levy, University of Missouri. All AWWNM programs are free and open to the public.

 Is poetry edible? What do recipes subtly reveal about different eras in American culture? Jennifer Cognard-Black, just returned from a Fulbright Scholar sojourn in Slovenia, will moderate a panel stirring these and other thought-provoking blends of food, American cultural history and literature.           
         Cognard-Black, a professor of English at St. Mary's College in Maryland, will be joined by Melissa Goldthwaite and April Linder, professors at St. Joseph's University, and E.J. Levy of University of Missouri to explain how recipes can be seen as a "foundational text" in America.             
         Goldthwaite and Cognard-Black are finishing up a book tentatively titled "Books that Cook: The Making of a Literary Meal", structured from "Starters" to "Desserts", as a kind of anthology exploring American food literature from the Colonial era through today, but emphasizing 20th and 21st century food.              
         A recipe is included in each section.            
         "Books That Cook: The Making of a Literary Meal can be read as literature or used as a cookbook, thereby blurring the distinction between these genres", Cognard-Black explained.            
            "The inclusion of a well-known cookbook excerpt at the beginning of each section, from Amelia Simmons to Alice Waters, both frames and shapes the literary pieces that follow," Goldthwaite added.                
         Cognard-Black specializes in Anglo-American women writers of the Victorian period, and fiction writing. She has written for Ms. magazine and written under the pseudonym of J. Annie MacLeod. Three of her short stories have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and she has been published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.               
           Goldthwaite, who teaches rhetorical theory and creative writing, is the author of The St. Martin's Guide to Teaching Writing, The Norton Reader, and other texts.    
            E.J. Levy recently won the prestigious Flannery O'Connor Prize for her collection of short fiction. April Linder is the author of the novel: Jane, a re-telling of Jane Eyre.  
         Bon Appetit!


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Tues, August 14
Kathy Jentz Barbara Glickman
Kathy Jentz
Barbara Glickman

"Dirty Secrets of Gardening & Writing About It"
Kathy Jentz, Editor and publisher of Washington Gardener magazine, will moderate a panel discussion Tuesday, August 14 at Amerian Women Writers National Museum, 1275 K St NW.

Barbara Glickman, local gardener and author of Capital Splendor--Gardens and Parks of Washington, D.C., will join Jentz and two additional "surprise" local gardening writer/experts, who will answer questions and sign books.

Kathy Jentz, editor and publisher of Washington Gardener magazine, will moderate a panel discussion focusing on gardening issues in the Washington, D.C. tri-area; and, for writers: how to write books, articles and other materials about gardening.
        Barbara Glickman, local gardener and author of "Capital Splendor--Gardens and Parks of Washington, D.C." will join Jentz and two additional "surprise" local gardening experts/writers.
        Washington Gardener is "written entirely by local area gardeners", Jentz said.
        Jentz describes herself as "a life-long gardener from a family of farmers and dedicated gardeners" who believes that "growing plants should be stress-free and enjoyable. Inspiration over perspiration".
        Inspiration is author Glickman's mantra too, as evinced in her book featuring 32 gardens in the D.C. tri-area. "I focus on the overall description, highlights and history. Meadowlark Gardens is an example of a lesser-known area garden I describe. I hope Capital Splendor will entice people to find gardens 'new' to them", Glickman explained.
        Glickman just planted 200 basil plants that she started from two seed packs. "I also plant tomatoes and berries in my front yard becuse the backyard is shaded", she added.
        Jentz' writing is featured in numerous area publications: the Washington Examiner, Pathways magazine, and Washington Women magazine. Jentz appears regularly on Chanels 9 and 4 and on WAMU 88.5 radio.
        In addition to tips on writing about gardens and gardening, the panel will discuss how to stretch gardening resources, and "inspirewith new ideas and new ways of looking at things", Jentz said.
        Dig in!


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Thurs, July 12
Carmen Calatayud
Maritza
Poet Carmen Calatayud
Maritza Rivera
Consuelo Hernandez
 
Consuelo Hernandez

ENCUENTROS LATINAS INFORMALES

D.C. area Latina women writers are invited to AWWNM, 1275 K ST NW, Suite 102 (shared space 13th St. entrance) from 11:30-1:30 p.m. for an informal gathering where D.C. area poet Carmen Calatayud will chair a discussion to plan a January 29, 2013 Latina Poets panel at AWWNM. Calatayud will also read selections from her new poetry book "In the Company of Spirits" to debut in September. Other Latina writers and poets are cordially invited to read from their work impromtu, and join the planning session. The January 29 AWWNM event will be co-sponsored by Letras Latinas at the Institute for Latino Studies of Notre Dame University. The general public is invited to meet and hear these talented women writers.


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing
Tues, July 10
Brenda Cough Brenda Cough
Kathy Harig
Ann Hudak
Brenda Cough  
Leona Fisher

Derring-do & Nancy Drew Us In: Panel America's beloved Nancy Drew, plus other "girl sleuths", is the compelling topic of July 10 expert panelists: Ann Hudak, curator of UMaryland's online exhibition: Nancy Drew and Friends: Girls Series Books Rediscovered"; Leona Fisher, associate professor emeritus at Georgetown University whose book-in-progess is Was Nancy Drew a Girl Scout?; and ardent Nancy Drew fan Kathy Harig, WCEI radio mystery reviewer and proprietor of Mystery Loves Comany bookstore in Oxford, MD. Moderator Elizabeth Foxwell won the prestigious Agatha Award for best short story, the Dove Award for scholarship, and is managing editor of Clues: A Journal of Detection, reviews mysteries for Publishers Weekly, and edits the McFarland Companions to Mystery Fiction series.
For more details, See News & Updates Page  Across generations since the 1930's, iconic American "teen detective queen", 16 -year -old Nancy Drew, remains the ageless fictional heroine who inspired and entertained young women, and whose popularity continues unabated.

        An artistic rendering of Drew in her speedy roadster zooms to the AWWNM website.
        Sales of Drew "original version" hardcover books have surpassed sales of Agatha Christie titles, according to Wikipedia.
        Entertainment Weekly calls Nancy "The first female heroine embraced by little girls. Nancy lives in an endless summer of adventure and unlimited potential."
        "A cultural icon, Nancy Drew has been cited as a formative influence by prominent women: Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Sonia Sotomayor, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and former First Lady Laura Bush," according to Wikipedia.
        Nancy Drew mysteries were ghost-written by several American women authors under the pen name Carolyn Keene.
        Nancy Drew and other "girl sleuths" is the topic of a Tuesday July 10 panel discussion by D.C. area experts including:
        *Ann Hudak, literature and rare books curator of Special Collections at the University of Maryland Libraries. Hudak curated the "Nancy Drew and Friends: Girls Series Books Rediscoverd" exhibition at the University of Mryland-College Park. The expansive exhibit is available on line www.lib.umd.edu.
        *Leona Fisher, associate professor emerita of English at Georgetown University, has published several articles on Nancy Drew, and is at work on a book-in-progress: Was Nancy Drew a Girl Scout? Constructions of American Girlhood in the 20th Century. www.explore.georgetown.edu.
        *Kathy Harig, a former librarian who appears regularly on WCEI radio to review mysteries and other books, is an ardent Nancy Drew fan. A former librarian at Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore, she is now proprietor of the Mystery Loves Company bookstore in Oxford, Maryland. www.mysterylovescompany.com
        *Elizabeth Foxwell serves as managing editor of Clues: A Journal of Detection, the only U.S. scholarly journal on mystery and detective fiction. A winner of the prestigious Agatha Award for Short Story, she will moderate the July 10 panel. Foxwell, who reviews mysteries for Publishers Weekly, edits the McFarland Companions to Mystery Fiction series. The latest book in that series is Andrea Camilleri: A companion to the Mystery Fiction. www.elizabethfoxwell.com

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Fri, Jun 8

Brenda Cough Brenda Cough
Ellen Crosby
Marcia Talley
Brenda Cough Brenda Cough
Donna Andrews
Elizabeth Foxwell

MYSTERIOUS WOMEN WHO KNOW THEIR PLACE Former White House staffer, author Karna Bodman; Agatha Award winner Marcia Talley, journalist Ellen Crosby, and award-winner Donna Andrews will deconstruct their mystery-thriller books which all feature D.C., Virginia and Maryland locales. Mystery fiction scholar/editor Elizabeth Foxwell will moderate Friday, June 8 at American Women Writers National Museum, 1275 K St NW, Suite 102 (13th St. shared space entrance). Free and open to the public. See News & Updates page for detailed News Release.

 Hey! I know that place! Recognizing landmarks familiar to us is great fun when reading or watching films. "Place" is often as much a vibrant character in a novel as human characters.
        Friday, June 8 at AWWNM, five of the D.C. area's most recognized, nationally acclaimed mystery writers will deconstruct how they interweave D.C., Maryland and Virginia locales into their award-winning mystery/thriller novels.
        
        President Reagan's Press Secretary Jim Brady's former deputy—now thriller author Karna Bodman—draws on issues of technology and national defense around the Beltway. Her latest book Castle Bravo debuts at the Book Expo in NYC the week preceding the June 8 AWWNM panel. Bodman, who met daily with Reagan and rode on Air Force One, was once the highest-ranking woman on the White House staff.
        Agatha Award winner Marcia Talley's protagonist Hannah Ives sleuths in the Chesapeake Bay and Annapolis area where Tally used to work at the U.S. Naval Academy library. The Last Refuge is her latest novel. Talley is an alumna of Oberlin College and University of Maryland.
        
Long-time print and radio journalist Ellen Crosby, a former U.S. Senate economist, sets her mysteries with vineyard owner Lucie Montgomery in Virginia's wine country. Crosby's latest work is The Sauvignon Secret. She is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and Catholic University of America.
         Award-winner Donna Andrews has composed more than a dozen mysteries featuring blacksmith Meg Langslow and locales in Andrews' birthplace of Yorktown, Virginia. Her latest novel is The Real Macaw. University of Virginia graduate Andrews also pens a mystery series with artificial intelligence personality Turing Hopper.

        Panel moderator Elizabeth Foxwell, who reviews books for Publisher's Weekly, is managing editor of Clues: A Journal of Detection and editor of the McFarland Companions to Mystery Fiction series. Foxwell is recipient of the Agatha Award for best short story, and the Dove Award for contributions to scholarly study of mystery and crime fiction. Foxwell holds degrees from Georgetown University and University of Maryland.
         The Friday, June 8 panel is free and open to the public at: American Women Writers National Museum (AWWNM) 1275 K St NW, Suite 102 (13th St shared space entrance) awwnm1@gmail.com


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Thurs, Jun 7



Carole Sargent

FREE ADVICE: "Sh-h-h-h-h..Don't Tell Anyone: Secrets to Finding a Literary Agent", a lecture by Carole Sargent, Georgetown University's Director of Scholarly Publications.
(Details on News & Updates Page)

 

You either have written the Great American Novel, or you are confident you can write it.
         You've heard that your success chances are increased if you snag an agent to represent your hard work. But how do you GET a literary agent, and when and how should you begin searching?
         In her popular advice lecture "Sh-h-h-h- Don't Tell Anyone: Secrets to Finding a Literary Agent", Carole Sargent, Georgetown University's director of scholarly publications, reveals her literary secrets Thursday, June 7 from 11:30 -1:30 p.m. at the American Women Writers National Museum, 1275 K St. NW @ 13th street entrance.
           Sargent's expertise extends well beyond scholarly publications.
           She has placed authors' work with such mega-famous literary agencies as William Morris Endeavor, Trident Media, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, and others.
           "I'll disclose what literary agents are looking for in a book proposal or a potential author, and why you should get an agent before you even finish your book," Sargent said.
           Practicing what she preaches, Sargent placed two of her own books with top publishing house Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
           She'll share her time-tested tips for finding and working with agents. A Question time will follow her remarks.
           Before coming to Georgetown University publications, Sargent taught eighteenth-century English literature there. She earned a Ph.D. at the Unverisity of Virginia.


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Fri, May 11




May 11, 2012, “Fantastic Heroines” panel at AWWNM.

Brenda Cough Jeri Fence
Brenda Clough Jerri Smith-Ready

Panel: Fantastic Heroines of Sci Fi & Fantasy. Moderator Colleen Cahill, Library of Congress' Recommending Officer for Fantasy and Science Fiction. Panelists/authors: Brenda Clough, Mindy Klasky, L. Jagi Lamplighter, and Jeri Smith-Ready.
(Details on News & Updates Page)

Colleen Cahill, Library of Congress' recommending officer for fantasy and science fiction, will moderate a Friday May 11 lunchtime panel discussing: Fantastic Heroines of Sci Fi & Fantasy.
             The panel, sponsored by the American Women Writers National Museum at 1275 K St. NW @13th St. NW, (13th St. entrance) will be from 11:30-1:30 p.m.
             Joining Cahill to explore ways the Sci Fi/Fantasy heroine of 2012 is evolving, will be panelist authors: Brenda Clough, Mindy Klasky, L. Jagi Lamplighter and Jeri Smith-Ready.
             "This is such a great topic! Until very recently, in Sci Fi and Fantasy genres, a 'strong heroine' meant a woman who acted like a man: showing little vulnerability, and fighting evil with violence. But as society's perceptions of masculinity and femininity become more fluid, heroines can show strength in more nuanced and complex ways," explained panelist Smith-Ready, an  award-winning author of ten fantasy novels.
                 "Sci Fi and Fantasy heroines often face a double standard from readers and critics. Heroines' behavior is judged more harshly than that of heroes. Too many faults makes them bitches. Too few faults makes them ' Mary Sues'," Smith-Ready continued.
                 "If you are going to be a heroine in Sci Fi or fantasy, you'd better be fantastic! However, that's a balance in all fiction--we want to read about people who are like us, but also not like us", said Clough who writes for national magazines and is the author of several Sci Fi novels including "Revise the World," and  "How Like a God". 
                   "Searching out role models; seeking characters who inspire them to do more with their own lives, is one reason people read. We'll discuss the women of modern fantasy and sci fi, and where the best role models can be found," explained panelist L. Jagi Lamplighter. She used Shakespeare's The Tempest as inspiration for her Prospero novel trilogy.
                     Lawyer-librarian Klasky is a fantasy and paranormal romance writer.
                     "All the author panelists have something about the D.C. area in their works" Cahill added. Smith-Ready's SHADE trilogy for teens, and WVMP Radio series for adults are set in Maryland.
                       Cahill, who holds a Master degree in both history and library science, is also the Library of Congress' coordinator for digital conversion of the map and geography collection.

L-R: Sci Fi & Fantasy authors at AWWNM Panel - “Fantastic Heroines.” Jagi Lamlighter, Brenda Clough, Janice Law, Colleen Cahill, Jeri Smith-Ready.


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Fri, April 27

Feral Women & Other Humorous Oddities
Noon -- 2 p.m. Join Georgetown Seniors for lunchtime laughs with Heidi Herr's comedic take on Feral Women.

Heidi HerrFor some "bright spot" Friday April 27 lunchtime laughs, join the Georgetown seniors to hear librarian Heidi Herr's hilarious take on Feral Women, attack raccoons and other oddities.
             Yes, philosphy librarians can be comediennes too!
             Herr, who works at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore as outreach coordinator for Special Collections, and librarian for philosophy, combines scholarly research into America's rare books, with observational humor about the contents.
             Using a visual presentation, Herr shares laugh-out-loud drawings and descriptions of raccoon attacks, Feral Women, and other unintentionally humorous literary disconnects from a past American century.
             Who thought rare books could be so funny?
             Herr, who has mastered comedic timing and vivacious delivery,  describes herself as "A committed bibliophile with a penchant for discovering the oddities and hidden treasures in a collection."
               "I am constantly looking for new ways to connect students to scholarship within special collections," said Herr, who coordinates public events and showcasing of rare collections for Johns Hopkins.
               Joining Herr April 27 will be the Georgetown Seniors. Everyone is welcome to the free event.
                 She received a B.A. degree from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, and Master's degress in both English and LIbrary Science from the University of Maryland, College Park.


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Wed, April 25

Jane Austen Scholar Discusses New Book Jane Austen scholar Elizabeth Kantor explains how Kantor's exegesis of Austen's writing applies to America's 2012 dating scene. Lecture is Wednesday April 25, noon-1 p.m., at 1275 K St NW. Kantor is the author of "The Jane Austen Guide to Happily Ever After".

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Sun, April 22

Open House 1-7 p.m. Honoring state Center for the Book affiliates

American Women Writers National Museum
National Press Club Building
529 14th Street NW, Suite 960-C
Washington, D.C. 20045


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Tues, March 6

Reception, 4-6 p.m. Honoring Reading Partners of the Center for the Book,  Library of Congress. Lecture: “Feral Women".

American Women Writers National Museum
National Press Club Building
529 14th Street NW, Suite 960-C
Washington, D.C. 20045


Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Mon, March 5

Lecture: Men Writing as Women, noon-1 p.m., John Dedakis, CNN Senior Copy Editor, will join romance writer Amanda Brice and scholar Angie Chuang

Can men write convincingly and accurately from a woman's viewpoint? Or should men relinquish female character perspectives to women? Monday March 5, John Dedakis, CNN Senior Copy Editor for anchor Wolf Blitzer's "Situation Room", will join romance writer Amanda Brice, and scholar Angie Chuang as panelists exploring the topic of men writing as women.
             The literary event, free and open to the public, is 11:30-1:30 p.m. at American Women Writers National Museum (AWWNM), 1275 K Street NW. Suite 102 (Shared space entrance on 13th St. NW) McPherson and Metro Center stations. AWWNM is a 501 (c) (3) public charity. AWWNM founder Janice Law will moderate the panel discussion.
www.americanwomenwritersnationalmuseum.org

MARCH 5 PANELISTS:

                 John Dedakis, a long-time journalist, is Senior Copy Editor for anchor Wolf Blitzer's "Situation Room" on CNN. Dedakis is the author of two mystery genre novels which feature Lark Chadwick, a female protagonist. Dedakis, a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, is active with various literary groups. www.johndedakis.com
                 Amanda Brice, is president of Washington, D.C. Romance Writers, a chapter of the Romance Writers of America. Her debut novel "Codename: Dancer", released in 2011, will be followed by Pointe of No Return, set for May 14 release. Brice is a pseudonym for a local attorney practicing trademark law. www.amandabrice.net
                   Angie Chuang, assistant professor of journalism at American University School of Communication, focuses her research and teaching on identity and race issues in the news media. An award-winning staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, The Hartford Courant, and The Oregonian, Chuang's  work has also appeared in the Asian American Literary Review, the Washingtonian, and other publications.



Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

Men Writing As Women Panel

March 5, 2012 panel: "Men Writing As Women". L-R: Janice Law, Moderator;
and panelists Angie Chuang, John Dedakis and Amanda Brice.

Mon, Feb 13

AWWNM Grand Opening, 11:30-1:30 p.m at 1275 K Street NW Washington, D.C. 2005. Keynote: Roberta Shaffer, Asociate Librarian, Library Services, Library of Congress. Musical entertainment by Salvation Army brass ensemble.

Return to 2012 Programs Main Listing

American Women Writers National Museum
National Press Club Building
529 14th Street NW, Suite 960-C
Washington, D.C. 20045

info@americanwomenwritersnationalmuseum.org

[Home] [Events/Calendar] [In the media] [State-Meant 50 4 U] [Book Faces] [News & Updates] [Invites] [AWWNM's awesome speakers] [Contribute/Fundraising] [Asking the experts] [Readers & Friends] [Who are they?] [Contact]